Sintra & Cascais

Note: This post is from April 2015

We might not have waken up as early as we had planned, but there is only 30 minutes to Sintra with train, so there was no rush. We took the train to Sintra from Rossio station.

From the train station in Sintra we walked up a zigzag-road along the hill. It’s magically green, and there are artisans along all the way to the center. I bought some nice photographs of Lisbon from traveling Photographer, and Duilio bought some leather bracelets.

Sintra is high in the hills above Lisbon. It’s a small town that looks like a fairy tale, it has romantic parks and mysterious trails through the forest. Sintra is known for it’s 19th century aomantic architectural monuments, and it has castles, lot’s of nature, medieval buildings…  it’s just adoring.

It has been a tourist magnet for a while, it’s on UNESCO World Heritages Site since 1955. The ancient kings usually had their summer home here, since it’s not as hot as below and the coast. If you are in Lisbon this is a city you must visit.

Once we arrived the center of Sintra, we visited the tourist office to get a map. We already knew what we wanted to visit – Quinta da Regaleira.

View from Quinta de regaleira

View from Quinta de regaleira

The entrance fee to Quinta Da Regaleira is 6 euros and it was totally our favourite place to visit in Sintra.

The facade of the palace is characterized by Gothic pinnacles and an impressive octagonal towel. It was 5 floors and you can walk around inside it and see all the rooms (dressing room, office, kitchen, bedrooms, living room, billiards room etc) and furniture just as it was with the previous owner!

The land that is now Quinta da Regaleira has had many owners over the years. It’s from somewhere in the 18th century, and it was a private residence. It didn’t open up to public until 1997!

We love Quinta de Regaleira :)

We love Quinta de Regaleira :)

In the highest balcony in Quinta De Regaleria

In the highest balcony in Quinta De Regaleria

The property is romantic and has a palace, a chapel, and a luxurious park with lakes, grottoes, wells, benches, fountains, and many exquisite constructions.

It’s really huge! It has four hectares of land in the surrounding and a treed park with myriad roads and footpaths. The coolest thing is the extensive system of tunnels, which have multiple entry points that include the grottoes, the chapel, Waterfall Lake, and ”Leda’s Cave,”. The ”Initiation Well”  connects to other tunnels via a series of underground walkways.

In the gardens

In the gardens

They have their own chapel in the gardens!

They have their own chapel in the gardens!

Crossing over a small river to get into a cave in Quinta de Regaleira

Crossing over a small river to get into a cave in Quinta de Regaleira

Discovering the caves in Quinta de Regaleira

Discovering the caves in Quinta de Regaleira

Well, hello there boyfriend!

Well, hello there boyfriend!

 

The Initiation Wells are two wells that are more like underground towers with stairs. They have never been water sources, they were used for ceremonial purposes that included Tarot initiation rites. The tunnels connect to these wells, aswell as vaces and other monuments around the park. The length of the “inverted tower” and the number of steps in the stairs are somehow connected to tarot mysticism.

In one of the wells

In one of the wells

The initiation well

The initiation well

 

After spending a couple of hours around this mansion and tunnels we were starving. We found a little restaurant on our way from Quinta da Regaleira to Castelo da Pena, which had a nice view. The cheese here was great! We sat outside and yes, I burnt my shoulders, haha.

Eating lunch in the sun!

Eating lunch in the sun! Well, Duilio was in the shade…

Our plan was to walk up to the Castelo de Pena, the big colorful castle you see in the top, but we gave up that idea, it’s yet another zigzag road up about 45 minutes, and the sun was gazing so….. Instead we walked to the bus station to take a bus up, I think it was about 5 euros for a 2 way ticket, but we met a woman and her family there who had walked down, so they had one way still on their ticket, which they gave to us :) So we got up and down for free!

Castelo da Pena, colorful!

Castelo da Pena, colorful!

The entrance in Castelo de Pena

The entrance in Castelo de Pena

The entrance fee to Castelo De Pena was 14€, quite expensive, but since it’s sort of the landmark of Sintra we wanted to check it out. The palace stands on the top of a hill in the Sintra Mountains above the town of Sintra.

The castle itself is super cool from the outside, so colorful and majestic. And the view from the castle was fantastic – you could see everything! But the inside of the castle wasn’t that special, and neither the gardens which were nothing more than forest and a lake with a cute tower… so yes, I enjoyed Quinta da Regaleira more :)

In Castelo Da Pena!

In Castelo Da Pena!

Spectacular views!

Spectacular views!

Sitting in the archs watching the beautiful view

Sitting in the archs watching the beautiful view

Walking in the gardens of the National Palace Da Pena

Walking in the gardens of the National Palace Da Pena

In the gardens of Castelo da Pena

In the gardens of Castelo da Pena

Around 8 in the evening we took the train back, the time really flies in Portugal! We bought some wine, cheese and bread on the super market on our way home and sat in the hostel kitchen and relaxed.

On Sunday we got up early to take the train to Cascais, but when we got to the station there was a strike going on in the public transport! …So there were no buses or trains or trams.. We were supposed to meet up a couple of friends I made while I was in Brazil who lived in Cascais in the evening, and we really wanted to go there.

So we rented some bikes, it costed 25€ (there was quite a line there since everyone thought as us;) – and then we biked about 30km along the coast until we reached Cascais.

Selfie while biking! Haha

Selfie while biking! Haha

It was very windy, but the sun was burning, so we managed to get a really nice tan with nice marks of our clothes and watches, haha. We made a few stops along the way on some beaches. In Carvahelos beach we had some milkshakes and food and we also wanted to check out the water – so we put our feet in the water to see how it was – and it was COLD!!

Checking out the water.... conclusion: Not bath-season!

Checking out the water…. conclusion: Not bath-season!

Along the coast

Along the coast

Cascais is a lively summertime town where lot’s of local people go for the summer. Before it was mostly a fishing village.

There was still a few hours left until we were supposed to meet up with Miguel, so we found a place in leeward on the beach and ate our sandwiches we had brought with us.

Enjoying some beach in Cascais :)

Enjoying some beach in Cascais :)

The sun was shining at it last hour and we were a little bit worried about our way back, since we had a dinner-date with Miguel and Leonor, and then we would need to bike back 30 kms again… But fortunately Miguels car was a big combi, where our bikes (after some struggling) actually fitted, so he could drive us back. So sweet! :) And such a relief! Haha.

We visited Miguels home, he lives in the center in an old apartment with his family, I would say that’s a very typical Portuguese home, very cozy and filled with stuff and memories. They let us try som Pastel de Pascua (easter-cake) and we talked with his family who speaks Spanish, and they helped us in how to go to Porto.

Leonor came after a while and we went to eat dinner at a local restaurant with very good prices.  Duilio had his third kind of Bacalhau here, “Bacalhau de crema”. I had a vegetarian omelette made for me. I also ordered a first course “vegetable soup” – but it didn’t look to vegetarian, it had some meat in it. What I enjoyed most, beside the company of course, was the desert – I tried something called “Baba de camelho” and that was truly delicious, like a caramel mousse.. Yummi!

Having dinner with Miguel and Leonor :)

Having dinner with Miguel and Leonor :)

Then we had some drinks at another place and we tried some Moscatela – another good local wine/liquor. It was quite smoky inside haha.

We wandered around Cascais, it’s a very cozy and pittoresque small town with cobblestone streets and shops, I can see how lively it can be during summer. We passed by the enormous big Casino and then visited Eleonors house in the outsides of Estoril, completely different from Miguels typical city-apartment, her house was super big with a garden and the whole basement was just a saloon with billiards and everything just to have people over for parties or get together :)

Walking around empty Cascais at night

Walking around empty Cascais at night

We rounded up the night and Miguel drove us back all the way to Lisbon even though he had to get up early next morning for university, we are truly grateful for that!

Next morning, on Monday, we went down with our bikes to the place where we had rented them. Then we did the check-out at the hostel and took the subway to Oriente where the train to Porto left. On our way there it started raining – buh, we have had such a good luck the whole week with sunshine and between 20-30 degrees everyday! I think it was raining to make it easier to say good bye ;)

There was off course still strike and plenty of cancelled trains and busses – but we managed to jump on the first train that left – we bought our ticket 12.04 and the train left 12.09!! YES, we ran like crazy! Haha!

 

 

Discovering historical Belém and Lisbons nightlife

Note: This post is from April 2015

After breakfast we walked down to the station Cais do Sodre. We bought a so called ”Zapping card” – 5 euros, and you can travel with every transport within Lisbon, even to Sintra and Cascais. Today we were going to Belem, so we took the Tram 15 to Belen. There were SO LONG cues and the tram was completely filled. Poor people that lives there and have do deal with all us tourists!

So Belém is famous as the place from which many of the great Portuguese explorers set off on their discovery voyages, like to India and Brazil. It is also a former royal residence and features the 17th–18th century Belém Palace, now occupied by the President of Portugal.

In the gardens and fountains in front of the Jeronimo Monastery

In the gardens and fountains in front of the Jeronimo Monastery

The cues outside the Jeronimo Monastery

The cues outside the Jeronimo Monastery

Once there we saw some very long cues at Dos Jeronimos, were we wanted to enter. So we thought, maybe a little bit later. Instead we walked down to Torre de Belém.

On our way there we passed by some big monuments, like the Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument of discoveries).

The Belém tower was built as a fortified lighthouse from the 1500 and made to guard the entrance to the port. It’s been a military outpost built to protect from Pirates and enemy attacks.  It’s a beautiful little tower on a small island in the Tagus-river, attached to the mainland with a small bridge, but the cueues were also sooo long…. So we just watched it from outside and walked along the path and the port. More people tried to sell us weed and stuff again.

The Stone of the discoveries. Huge!

The Stone of the discoveries. Huge!

The Tower of Belém, from the 1500, a military outpost to protect from pirates and enemies

The Tower of Belém, from the 1500, a military outpost to protect from pirates and enemies

Cute turquoise house down the port

Cute turquoise house down the port

We walked back to Mosteiro Dos Jeronimos again, and there were not fully that long cues now, but enought. While Duilio was in the cue I went to buy us some really nice sandwiches, some beer and some pastel de nata. That’s the good thing about being 2 who travel.

Inside it was a quite fantastic place. The Tower of Belém was party built to defend this place. There are so many details, I loved the roof.
There are different saloons with history and it was a pleasant stay. All though I do not recommend to visit the Chapel, which you have to make yet another cue to go in there, and is definitively not worth it, just a dark room.
Both the Belém-Tower and the Monastery is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Inside the Monastery. Really cool!

Inside the Monastery. Really cool!

The roofs around the monastery are spectacular!

The roofs around the monastery are spectacular!

We enjoyed our first Pastel de Nata inside the Monastery :)

We enjoyed our first Pastel de Nata inside the Monastery :)

We walked around a bit and found a nice park where we watched people and then took a siesta. It was a nice park with a lot of people around, we were asked about 2 or 3 times from different kids sport teams if we wanted to buy some lottery or something. Cute :)
I made some macramé bracelets and Duilio got together with a bunch of guys playing fotball. :)

Duilio joined a team and played some fotball

Duilio joined a team and played some fotball

We took the tram back and walked up the hill to Bairro Alto. We went into a coffee shop just beside our hostel and hade some ”fika” – Pastel de coco, sandwich of mortadela and 2 coffees for 5,6 euro. Totally ok, in Sweden it would be around 17 euros :)

Went home and showered again after yet another sweaty day, and then we met up with my mothers friend Filippa who is now living in Lisboa with her Portuguese ”boyfriend”Jose or ”Ze” as they say to all the Joses here.

We walked to the Alafama area and ate at a restaurant, we sat outside which was a little bit chilly actually (and no seat cushions), but it was ok :) We had some Vino Verdhe for the first time, really good wine!

We all talked in ”Portuñol” – which is a mix between Spanish and Portuguese, since all of us didn’t speak the same language. We talked about the traffic, politics, the differences between Portugal, Spain and Sweden. It was a very interesting and pleasant evening. We also brought them a swedish ”Påskägg” – a big egg filled with Swedish candy, which was appreciated :)

Dinner in Alafama with Zé and Filippa

Dinner in Alafama with Zé and Filippa

My vegetarian dinner

My vegetarian dinner.. not o much to brag about, but no meat, thats good ;)

After we said our goodbyes me and Duilio walked back to our hostel, we made a stop at Cafe A Brasileria in Baixa/Chiado area , it’s one of the oldest and famous cafés in the old Lisbon. It opened 1905 :) We had some Vermut there.

Having some Vermut in Cafe A Brasileira

Having some Vermut in Cafe A Brasileira

Then we walked to Bairro Alto and went higher up to visit the lively night neighborhood. It has small streets, it’s full of people and it’s packed with a high variety of bars. On weeknights bars close at 2 am, weekends at 3 am. There was people literally eeeeeverywhere!

It’s like a big street party, you go in to a bar and order something, and then bring it out and drink it out on the streets. Haha. We first sat down in a place and tried some more local liquors like ”Licor de Beirao”, but then we just ordered from some bars and took it with us around the streets and some people-watching. One Moragnoska and one beer costed 8 euros. Totally ok once again :) (swedish price would be around 20 euros).

In the lively streets of Bairro Alto at night

In the lively streets of Bairro Alto at night

 

The city of the 7 hills – Lisbon, Portugal

Note: This post is from April, 2015

 

Leaving fairly cold Sweden for Portugal!

Leaving fairly cold Sweden for Portugal!

We were all excited about our trip Portugal, but the first day didn’t start so well. Yes, since I had written this down, I feel like I have to complain a bit. But if you’re interested in what Lisbon has to offer, just scroll down! :)

We arrived in Lisbon Wednesday evening. The flight went quickly even though we had a stopover in Vienna. But from Vienna to Lisbon we got our seats on different rows…  Well, doesn’t matter that much, it was a short flight. Also there was no vegetarian food for me, of couse… There’s never. So now I don’t like Lufthansa so much.

We arrived in Lisbon quite late around 21 and took a taxi to our hostel. The taxameter was on 11,50 euros, but then the driver wanted to charge us 19 euro because we had luggage with us! We got to see the chart were it says that yes, it costs like 4 euros for luggage, extra 3 euros for airport etc etc. So well. We paid that.

We stayed at Passport Lisbon Hostel, right in the famous Praça Luís de Camões. But we couldn’t find the entrance…. We were just outside the number 36, and it was a just a regular door to an apartment building, with a code, and we did not have any code… So we stood there for a while until some other girls were going in to the hostel, and followed in. The elevator was so small we couldn’t fit our two together and our packback… So we walked up to the reception, which was also super small. We checked in and bought a beer there to bring up to our rooms, hehe, well worth it after all the floors we had to walk up!

We got in to our room and it was…… not as expected. Sure we are not luxury-travelers or anything, but the hostel looked really cool when we looked it up on booking. We got a room just next to the kitchen, and we had a private toilet but it was outside our room, so we had to go out in the hallway to go to the toilet.. .Which means you have to get dressed if you want to pee in the night. Well well… Also not that big deal.

This is what our room looked like, but it was not as spacious as it looks, and nothing else there... Picture taken from their website

This is what our room looked like. Picture taken from their website

But then the room was very basic, everything I had seen online that made it look rustic and awesome on the pictures actually just looked rusty and dusty in reality. We did not have a working night lamp, our night stand was broken (it was a book screwed into the wall that has broken, so it was just a book on the floor now), there was NO furniture at all – basically just a bed and you had to put your backpack and your clothes on the floor… no balcony (most of the rooms have a french balcony), we only got 1 really thing pillow each… And on top of that  it was super hot this nigh (it was really unnecessary for us to bring so much long-sleeved). I didn’t manage to fall asleep until 6 in the morning. Buh :(

Next day we woke up when the hostel started serving breakfast, since we could hear everything in our room. Not that much of a breakfast, yoghurt, cereal and white bread with cheese. There’s some construction going out just outside so it was not so pleaseant sound at when we had the window opened. We started by asking the reception to fix the light in the room and to give us a few extra pillows, there was no problem with that at all. Then we took a couple of chairs from the kitchen ”borrowed it” to have as furniture in our room, haha.

THEN, FINALLT, the adventure began!

View over Elevador Santa Justa from the hilltop

View over Elevador Santa Justa from the hilltop

Lisbon is the capital and the largest city of Portugal, it has about 550000 habitants. It’s one of the oldest cities in the world, actually older then London, Paris and Rome by centuries. It’s built on 7 hills, so you are almost always going either up or down :)

Our hostel was in the Bairro Alto (the upper town), in one of the hills in Lisbon.

We walked down towards the water and the neighbourhood Baixa (lower town). We could se the big Christ on the other side of the water, we had also seen him from the flight yesterday. The Monument is in Almada on the other side of the river Tagus, it resembles de Corcovado monument in Rio De Janeiro and was built after the second world war as a memorial of thanks that Portugal was spared of the destruction of the war.

It was beautiful down by the water, nice walking areas, boats, people walking everywhere… It reminds me of Spains coast.

Within 15-20 minutes three different guys asked us if we wanted to buy Marijuana/Hash/Cocaine. We were quite chocked first, but we got used to it. I don’t know if it’s because of my dreads or Duilios curly hair, if we are a young couple, or if they just ask everyone. Haha.

It was a sunny and super warm day, about 30 degrees. Not that very common for being april! Of course we found some Swedes in bikinis in the small beach by Praca do comercio, haha.

Quite odd plastic puffs to sit on next to the water

Quite odd plastic puffs to sit on next to the water

Tourists enjoying the small city beach :)

Tourists enjoying the small city beach :)

The gate of Praca do Comercio, and a guy trying to sell us drugs

The gate of Praca do Comercio, and a guy trying to sell us drugs

We visited a lot of small artisanian shops.The daughter of one of the managers in a small shop we visited painted a drawing and gave to Duilio. So sweet :) She spoke spanish because her father is Peruvian. We kept walking around for a few hours along the water, then we needed to cool down and eat something, so we walked all the way back and then sat down at Café Vitoria in one of the main streets the city center.

Lisbon is full of trams, cars, there are constructions everywhere, half torn down buildings, but it feels safe and very homely. But yes, the traffic is horrific, I would NEVER drive here! There are cars and trams coming from all the sides! Haha

In the center of Lisboa there are quite many downed buildings... some of them even abandoned

In the center of Lisboa there are quite many downed buildings… some of them even abandoned

The buildings around here have quite spectacular facades..

Some of the buildings around here have quite spectacular facades..

Along the beach walk - painted house

Along the beach walk – painted house

Visiting crafts shops close to Praca do comercio - please notice the white man in the back who is painting his face white in the reflection of the window :)

Visiting crafts shops close to Praca do comercio – please notice the white man in the back who is painting his face white in the reflection of the window :)

The famous trams

The famous trams


There’s a lot of traffic everywhere
, but there is a few main streets in the center that are closed and only to shops and restaurants so it was peaceful there. We ordered fried potatoes and vegetarian crepes and tried Pera de gallinha and some other portuguese thing, and I ordered a medium beer which was huge! We were enjoying our selves so much this first chill vacation days with hot weather, haha.

Gallinha de Pera and Crepe Vegetal

Gallinha de Pera and Crepe Vegetal

At café Vitoria, enjoying or "medium sized beer" :)

At café Vitoria, enjoying or ”medium sized beer” :)

We went to visit the famous Castelo de São Jorge, a hilltop fortification that you can see from wherever you are in Lisboa. On our way up there we passed some really cool streets with plenty of beautiful street art on the walls. Loved it!

Around alfama on our way up to Castelo Sao Jorge, beautiful grafitti!

Around alfama on our way up to Castelo Sao Jorge, beautiful grafitti!

The last bit we took the elevator up to the Colina. The entrance fee to Castelo had gone up to 8,5 euros per person. There was a lovely view from there, you could see the whole Lisboa in front of you. Apparently all the houses have orange ceiling! I couldn’t stop singing the intro song to the series Weeds ”Little houses on the hillside” when I was there, haha.

View over the orange roof tops in Lisboa

View over the orange roof tops in Lisboa

But anyhow, the proper Castelo de S. Jorge wasn’t that much of a big deal – I know it has been there for a long time and lived through Visigoths in the 5th century, Moors in the 9th century, Christians in the 12th century, royals from the 14th to 16th centuries, and convicts in every century.. But now it’s pretty much just stones. You could walk around there above the walls and inside, but it wasn’t that special inside.

Castelo Sao Jorge

Castelo Sao Jorge

Outside Castelo Sao Jorge, duilio is hiding from the sun.

Outside Castelo Sao Jorge, duilio is hiding from the sun.

We went home for a quick shower and then just walked outside our hostel  – just in the square ”Praça Luís de Camões” – to join the Free walking tour that had their meeting point there :)
It was quite a big group – and guess what – ONLY spanish people!! Duilio was the only one that wasn’t from Spain. Haha. Since it was easter – all the spanish had a few days of do travel in the areas around, and they all got here to Lisbon. We heard spanish eeeeverywhere.

Our guide was funny, he really loved his countrys’ food and music, but hated its politics. We discovered a lot of new places, around in Bairro Alto, Chiado and Alfama.

A street with a nose. (Apparently there are many restaurants around here so this is a good place to smell Lisboa)

A street with a nose. (Apparently there are many restaurants around here so this is a good place to smell Lisboa)

Street music around Bairro Alto

Street music around Bairro Alto

With our guide in the middle of the mainstreet Rua Augusta

With our guide in the middle of the mainstreet Rua Augusta

A wall in Bairro Alto where they have azulejo of all the typical and traditional portuguese things

A wall in Bairro Alto where they have azulejo of all the typical and traditional portuguese things

Alfama is the oldest district of Lisbon, it was the largest part of the city during the Islamic Invasion of Ibera. Increasingly, the Alfama was inhabited by fishermen and the poor, and it continues so to this day. We got to hear about the Great Earthquake that destroyed almost everything in the year 1755 – except for Alfama, thanks to its compact labyrinth of narrow streets and probably because it’s built on firmer rock. Alfama is cozy and historical, old buildings mixed with Fado bars, restaurants, small shops and pracas. And yes, you can easily get lost there ;)

While there we tried Ginja de obidos, a liquor not to far from here – so good! We also listened to the traditional music Fado. After a few hours of walking around the tour ended and we watched the sunset from the roofs of Alafama. Then we were hungry!!

IMG_1371

Ginja D’Obidos – a liquor from Obidos, fruity and sweet!

Alfama, narrow streets and restaurants or bars in every corner

Alfama, narrow streets and restaurants or bars in every corner

In Alfama, the typical square where there are nice restaurants with fado.... And where they never even intended to invite us in..

In Alfama, the typical square where there are nice restaurants with fado…. And where they never even intended to invite us in..

We walked around in Alafama to find a good but cheap and not so touristic place to eat, that also had something vegetarian. Most of the waiters didn’t even bother to look at us or invite us in, or even show us the menu.. We probably looked to poor to them and they were out after more spending tourists. Well… F them – so we kept walking and walking until we found a cute little restaurant – called ”Almargem” very close to the Cathedral – and the waiter was lovely! He showed us the meny and in portuguese of course, told all about how it was made and what was in it. It was a great service!

Our waitor at Almargem :)

Our waitor at Almargem :)

Very happy with my vegetarian Caldereida :)

Very happy with my vegetarian Caldereida :)

The entrance of the restaurant

The entrance of the restaurant

They had the typical portuguese course ”Caldeleira” in a vegetarian option – and it was soooo good! Duilio had som Bacalao, a fish which they have everywhere here and can cook in about 4000 different ways, haha. We were surprised that you pay for entrances (different cheeses and bread) since we didn’t request them and they brought them just like that to the the table, so we thought it was free and was super happy about it and ate it all –  but that was not the case… Haha. It was around 8 euros. And since we had a very nice experience at that restaurant, we didn’t mind paying that either, it was good cheese and bread :)

Then we went home for some good sleep.

Next day; BELEM! I will tell you in another post, this is to long!

Working on a confirmation camp in Flen, Sweden

I almost never write about my home country, Sweden. I thought I should do that too, in case someone is interested in what we have to offer here. ;)

Last weeks I’ve been in Flen, in Södermanland. A small town with about 6000 habitants. It’s just about 2 hours drive from Stockholm.

I’ve been actually working in the kitchen on a confirmation camp with the Swedish Church. And not any confirmation camp at all. One that is open to all kind of people, they don’t care about chromosomes as they say. So there are people with some kind of handicap, like autism, downs syndrome, adhd, or just nothing at all.

” Confirmation is a rite of initiation in several Christian denominations,[1] normally carried out through anointing, the laying on of hands, and prayer, for the purpose of bestowing the Gift of the Holy Spirit. (…) In Christianity, confirmation is seen as the sealing of the covenant created in Holy Baptism

 

On our way down, we stopped to buy some food. We had a very small car, and very much food… So started our 2 hour roadtrip like this:

How the heck are we supposed to get this into the car???

How the heck are we supposed to get this into the car???

Fully packed car!!

Like this! Fully packed car!! And we even had to go a second time!

The leaders having our first meal together before the confirmands arrived to the camp

The leaders having our first meal together before the confirmands arrived to the camp

 

I’m myself not confirmated, not even baptised. But if I had been, I would have liked to attend to this camp when I was about 14 years old. It is beautiful, they do many fun activities (like their own t-shirts, cups, bookmarks,  go kayaking, hiking etc) and they sing a lot. It’s very cozy.

 

Worshipping at the beach, and singing songs

Worshipping at the beach and singing songs on the reunion weekend

Singing songs around the fire "Lägerbål"

Singing songs around the fire ”Lägerbål”

They put a tarp on the grass, sprayed it with water and soap, put on their rain clothes and voilá!

They put a tarp on the sloping grass, sprayed it with water and soap, put on their rain clothes and voilá!

Gålötryckaren - "gålö-cheek to cheek-dance" - at the end of the disco

Gålötryckaren – ”gålö-cheek to cheek-dance” – at the end of the disco at reunion-weekend


Here in Sweden they are protestants
, and I’ve learned a lot about ”our” religion during this time. I don’t consider myself of any religion though, but I think this one is the fairest inside the christianity. Our priest at the camp is for example a homosexual woman, married to the bishop of Stockholm. So yes, in this religion, it is ok to be who you are. It’s fantastic. I grew up in Spain where they are catholics, where women can’t be priests, where priests can’t get married, where the church think being homosexuality is not ok.

I am proud of Sweden.  

I got the job through a friend of mine, and I worked together in the kitchen with my boyfriend Duilio and a girl named Alva. We worked two weekends here during spring, and now 3 weeks during summer, then 1 more weekend in autumn. It’s a big sort of ”conference center” in Flen. Quite an outdated center, but on a nice location, just by a lake and with surrounding green forest and horse pastures.

 

I love alleys.

I love alleys.

Horses

Horses

Beautiful sunset by the other side of the lake, close to Yxtaholm

Beautiful sunset by the other side of the lake, close to Yxtaholm

Beautiful sunset!!!! Also by the other side of the lake, in april on our first weekend.

Beautiful sunset!!!! Also by the other side of the lake, in april on our first weekend.

Finally some time of between lunch and dinner - out and enjoying the sun!

Finally some time of between lunch and dinner – out and enjoying the sun!

Jose fishing

Jose and Duilio fishing

After 2 weeks my cousin Jose from Barcelona came to visit, his first time in Sweden. He helped us in the kitchen too. He was quite serious in the beginning, everything must have been so new and weird for him. Not only to come to Sweden, which has another culture then Spain, but also to this camp, with this religion, all kind of different people and different rules. We eat early compared to Spain, breakfast at 8.30, lunch at 12, and dinner at 17.30. He eats dinner about 11-12pm! Haha. Total change!

On our way back from picking up Jose at the airport :)

On our way back from picking up Jose at the airport :)

Ready to serve the food

Ready to serve the food

What a lovely dish-team!

What a lovely dish-team!

For example, before and every meal, we sing a song (something to thank the lord for the food or alike). If someone wants to say something, they raise their hand, and when you see someone with their hand up, you stop talking and raise your hand too, until everyone has their hand raised and is quiet. First time it happened with Jose he exclaimed ”Que pasa?!” (What is happening?!) haha.

Singin song after eating

Singin song after eating

We had to prepare breakfast, lunch, fruit-time, dinner and afternoon snack for about 40 people everyday. We worked from 8am to 8pm, and every 2-3 days went to the supermarket after that to buy lot’s of food. (About two supermarket trolleys full every 2-3 days).

Cooking and dishing..

Cooking and dishing..

One of our sunday-meals

One of our sunday-meals

Pyttipanna!

Pyttipanna!


We only got two days vacation in 3 weeks
, on the 17th and 18th day. We were completely exhausted. Both me, Alva, Jose and Duilio. We got a small cabin just about 100 metres away from the camp, lovely cabin, where we really enjoooooooyed our time off. SO MUCH!!!!

We have arrived at our cabin!!! :)

We have arrived at our cabin!!! :)

When we finished of dinner we went to the supermarket to buy some food, alcoholfree beer (not allowed with alcohol on the camp, but really wanted a beer), chips and chocolate. We went down to the lake for a fika, and then when the mosquitoes were eating us to much, back to the cabin where we played cards and kept eating unhealthy things until late, and next morning we slept until 11am. HEHE!

Lovely evening - our first of! Icecream, chokladbollar, chocolate, coffee.... :)

Lovely evening – our first of! Icecream, chokladbollar, chocolate, coffee…. :)

Enjoying our first evening of in the cabin :)

Enjoying our first evening of in the cabin :)


Next day, after a good nights sleep we went on a small trip to Katrineholm
(a close-by city with about 60.000 habitants).

We visited super cool and super big antique shop, had some ice-cream in town and went to a nice bathing area where I took my first swim in the Swedish water since like 5 years back. Then went back to town for a nice meal (I had veggie nachos) and then back to the camp, just doing nothing.

Visiting a huge antique shop in Katrineholm. Love this room!

Visiting a huge antique shop in Katrineholm. Love this room!

And the other room in the antique shop, you could get lost there!

And the other room in the antique shop, you could get lost there!

First swim in sweden for years!!!

First swim in sweden for years!!!

The gang who didn't take a swim.

The gang who didn’t take a swim.


Our last day (and second day) of vacation
, we went to another bathing area just about 5 minutes drive from the camp, supernice! Me, Jose AND Duilio jumped in the water, and even from the diving tower! Had a blast, ate pie and had a whole day of just sun and swedish summer.

At the beach in Flen on our day off :)

At the beach in Flen on our day off :)

Joses first swim in sweden!!

Joses first swim in sweden!!

When we got back it was time to pack our things up to move back to our small rooms by the kitchen, and go to the supermarket to shop for the remaining days of the camp.

The last 4 days passed by quickly and easily, we had a big buffet on the confirmation day for 130 people, but we got catering from the supermarket so we could manage that. That day I walked over 14km just inside our walls!! Not strange I felt so tired in my legs in the evening, haha.

Ready for buffét!

Ready for fika!

The buffet for 130 people!

The buffet for 130 people!

Last evening, gathering with all the parents

Last evening, gathering with all the parents


Our last day was this sunday,
we cleared out all the food that was left, cleaned the kitchen, or rooms, and left around 15. Then in the evening we were invited over to the priest Gunilla for some drinks and a great dinner. Sweet end of the camp!

Team picture after the camp at Gunillas home

Team picture after the camp at Gunillas home

 

Anyhow, now I’m back to my regular job at Ljud och bildmedia. Working 8am to 5pm and since it’s summer and vacation time, we barely have any customers,  it is very cool. But in a little bit then one week – then I have vacation – and I’m going to Spaaaain!!!! I haven’t been there in 2 years, so I’m really looking forward to it now!!

 

A few more pictures:

Marsaxlokk and Birżebbuġa in Malta

(So yes, it was a while ago we came back from Malta, but I’ve been to busy to write about it, at least about all days)

On our fourth day we visited Marsaxlokk, it’s a traditional fishing village located in the south-eastern part of Malta with about 3500 inhabitants.The bay of Marsaxlokk is in the southest point of Malta.

It’s about 40 minutes with public bus from the capital Valetta (public bus 81 or 85). It’s a really nice trip there, filled with vineyards on both sides of the road.

Nice restaurants and cafés at Marsaxlokk

A church and nice restaurants and cafés in Marsaxlokk

Marsaxlokk is well known because of the many colorful and traditional fishing boats called luzzu. The painted eyes on these luzzus are believed to protect the boats from danger.

Marsaxlokk bay

Marsaxlokk bay

Marsaxlokk bay

Marsaxlokk bay

The small fishing boats and the Luzzus

The small fishing boats and the Luzzus

Pretty colorful boats

Pretty colorful boats

In Marsaxlokk bay!

In Marsaxlokk bay!

I was surprised about how small the village was, you walk it through in about 10 minutes haha (at least the central point of it). We were happy to find a street market along the bay with delicatess food, souvenirs and clothing. We bought a few traditional souvenirs and some more :) The Marsaxlokk Market has a long history. The market took place even before the sea side restaurants who sell delicious food especially the fish.

A merchandist from Senegal, we bought some really cool stuff from there to our living room, for a very good price! :)

A merchandist from Senegal, we bought some really cool stuff from there to our living room, for a very good price! :)

Then we thought about visiting Birzebúgga, which is close by. The bus only goes once per hour, so we had a stop at a small shore/beach nexto the stop and bath our feet (cold water) and picked some sea shells before heading there.

A small beach outside the busstop

A small beach outside the busstop

Picking out some sea shells for future handicraft work :)

Picking out some sea shells for future handicraft work :)

Birżebbuġa is a seaside resort not far from Marsaxlokk with a population of about 10.000. It is popular among Maltese holiday-makers, and it has some important archaeological sites, like Għar Dalam and ”Borg in-Nadur”. It also has an artificial sandy beach commonly known as ”Pretty Bay”.

We were really hungry when we got there, so we looked around on a few of the restaurants by pretty bay and chose one. And boom, delicious food!!! I had a veggie burger and Duilio had a big plate with different typical Maltesean traditional foods. I’ve never seen him so happy! He said it was the best he ever tasted, haha.

Duilio, superhappy with his plate with different traditional maltesean food.

Duilio, superhappy with his plate with different traditional maltesean food.

 

With our stomaches full we went to the beach and fell asleep right there. Lovely. The beach is a really nice beach for Malta (which has very few beaches with white sand), but the view is only nice from one side, if you look at the other side, you see big cargo ships and a big main power station just there. Quite interesting, but not paradise-alike, haha.

Zzzzzzz! Best siesta ever.

Zzzzzzz! Best siesta ever.

Pretty bay in Birzebugga!

Pretty bay in Birzebugga!

View over Pretty bay on the other side, with the cargo station.

View over Pretty bay on the other side, with the cargo station.

Well home, we enjoyed our last night on our balcony in Sliema. You know one of those moments when you really enjoy and love life? That’s how we felt.

Perfect evening at the balcony in Sliema!

Perfect evening at the balcony in Sliema!

I love you!

I love you! (Doing a pose we saw some other girl do at the beach with her hair, haha)

 

Malta – Mdina, Rabat and Búggiba

We started the day by taking the bus to Mdina, commonly called ”The Silent City” by natives and visitors. It is a small medieval town and has about 300 habitants. The town is surrounded by thick defensive walls and a wide moat, separating it from its nearest town Rabat.

When Malta was under the Roman Empire, the roman Governor built his palace here. Mdina lies on one of the highest points on the island Malta and as far away from the sea as possible, so it’s probably the first fortified city because of the strategic location. There are evidence of settlements in Mdina back to 4000 BC.

The streets of Mdina

The streets of Mdina

Hello!

Hello!

Streets in Mdina

Streets in Mdina

Wtf? Hahaha. Why put a childrens head there? It's creepy.

Wtf? Hahaha. Why put a childrens head there? It’s creepy.

Beautiful with the red flower.

Beautiful with the red flower.

Super catholic here. Statues in every corner.

Super catholic here. Statues in every corner.

The transport in Mdina

The transport in Mdina

The church that wanted us to pay 5 euros to go in. Nope.

The church that wanted us to pay 5 euros to go in. Nope.

We walked around for a few hours, visited some museums (glad it was included in the ticket, because it wasn’t worth 10 euros), bought some typical Mdina Glass-souvenirs and had the greatest lemon cheese cake I’ve ever had at a café just above the wall with a nice view over the farmlands beneath.

It is a super cozy little town, with narrow streets and all buildings of lime stone, as everywhere else. It has plenty of churches and viewpoints over Malta.

Visited the national museum of Mdina. This was the coolest thing. Haha.

Visited the national museum of Mdina. This was the coolest thing. Haha.

Enjoying our coffee (fika) with a nice view in Mdina!

Enjoying our coffee (fika) with a nice view in Mdina!

Some maltesean farmers :)

Some maltesean farmers :)

Love the small details.

Love the small details.

 

Later we walked to the nearest town Rabat. The name of the village is derived from the Arabic word for ”suburb”, as it was the suburb of the old capital Mdina.

We had some nice sweets from a vendor on the street, delicious small things. We just wanted to try a few of the local sweets, so we asked for 2 different kinds, and it costed 2 euro! Quite expensive we thought, but then we looked in the bag, and apparently you get 4 each of every kind, so it ended up being very price worth :)

In Rabat!

In Rabat!

Streets of Rabat

Streets of Rabat

A church that looks like a cirkus :)

A church that looks like a cirkus :)

Duilio, always investigating what things are and how they work..... this

Duilio, always investigating what things are and how they work….. this

Local sweets!

Local sweets!

The two sweats we chose :)

The two sweats we chose :)

Rabat is home to the famous Catacombs of St. Paul and of St. Agatha. These catacombs were used in Roman times to bury the dead as, according to Roman culture, it was unhygienic to bury the dead in the city Mdina and parts of Rabat were built on top of an ancient Roman city.

It was included in our multi-pass ticket. We got an audio-guide and walked around in the catacombs. Two catacombs are open to the public, but these are only a small part of the entire St. Pauls and St. Agatha’s complex. And still: It was huuuuge!

The first catacomb we visited was quite small, there are surgical tools carved in relief in one of the blocking stones in the inner chamber and they think that it was the burial place of a group of surgeons.

In the small catacombs, the carving suggests that there were a group of surgeons lying in this catacomb

In the small catacombs, the carving suggests that there were a group of surgeons lying in this catacomb

Then we walked down to the main complex, which covers an area of more than 2000 square metres! It is a extensive system of underground galleries and tombs dated from the fourth to the ninth centuries BC. Very interesting. I loved it!

Plenty of catacombs, if you watch closely you can even see that they have carved out "pillows" of stone in the tomb!

Plenty of catacombs, if you watch closely you can even see that they have carved out ”pillows” of stone in the tomb!

Main complex in St Pauls Catacombs

Main complex in St Pauls Catacombs

Discovering the many many graves in the catacombs

Discovering the many many graves in the catacombs

Catacombs everywhere

Catacombs everywhere

It was so fun to see some other tourist doing poses in front of the catacombs that me and Duilio had to make some of ourselves.  But seriously, who poses in catacombs? Hahahah.

This is Duilio, in St Pauls Catacombs

This is Duilio, in St Pauls Catacombs

This is me, in St Pauls Catacombs

This is me, in St Pauls Catacombs

Then we took a bus to the north of malta, to visit the town Bugibba in St Pauls Bay. Buġibba’s sea front is very popular, so we thought we would have a day on the beach….. but the beach was almost the worst beach I’ve ever seen, haha. It looked like a construction site.

But we enjoyed the sun, took a siesta, a bath (Duilios first one in the Mediterranean sea) and I read my book. (And hated in silence some really disturbing Maltesean that thought they owned the beach and were the most cool on earth, drinking beer and yelling to women around them ”fuck you bitches!!”).

At the beach in Búgibba

At the beach in Búgibba

When we got tired we walked along the sea walk and found some public toilets. Here in Malta there are really good free public toilets EVERYWHERE, it’s great!! :)

Then we stopped by a nice small food stand with a view over the bay and had some veggie burgers, french fries and cisk-beer. And reeeally really loved life.. Haha.

Duilio having a veggie burger in Búgibba

Duilio having a veggie burger in Búgibba

Enjoying Cisk :)

Enjoying Cisk :)

View over the bay in Bugibba

View over the bay in Bugibba (and the ”beach”)

On our way back with the bus along the coast, we decided to jump of at St Julians and walk around there. It’s very touristic with hotels, pubs, bars and shops. Lot’s of young people on the streets and a big party vibe. It’s nice but I’m glad we are not living there haha. :) Bought like 3 pairs of earrings. Love them!

St Julians at night

St Julians at night

 

Malta – Hypogeum, Tarxien, The 3 cities, Sliema and Valetta

Well, HELLO again!!!

It’s been a while!! Haven’t been traveling lately, just enjoying spending some time at home in Stockholm, Sweden. But as we say in Swedish ”det kliar i fingrarna” (sort of that my fingers started itching) meaning that I really wanted to do just a little trip to someplace new! So I gave my boyfriend this gift for his birthday – a trip to Malta! (He didn’t know anything about it until his birthday :)

So the 20th of may we flew to Malta – an island in the mediterranean sea, somewhere between Sicily and Tunisia. Malta’s location has given it great strategic importance throughout history. Phoenicians, Romans, Moorish, Normans, Aragonese, Habsburg Spain, Knights of St. John, French and the British have ruled the islands during different periods. Malta gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1964 and became a republic in 1974.

Malta is a quite big tourist destination because of its warm climate with crystal clear water and architectural and historical monuments. It has plenty of UNESCO World Heritage Sites and temples.

We landed in the evening, took a bus from the airport to our hotel in Gzira close to Sliema. The bus really went everywhere and we didn’t understand at all were we were, but we arrived well. The bus ticket fare is 1,50€  for a day, as many trips as you want, so it’s really nice!!

Arriving in Sliema!

Arriving in Sliema!

Our room!! :)

Our room!! :)

Our ”room” was much better then expected – I thought it was only going to be a hotel room, but it also had a living room, a kitchenette and a balcony, and bathroom of course. So we were happy! And really hungry. After packing up we went to find a restaurant which the receptionist had recommended, called ”Ta Kris”.

The entrance to the restaurant, it's in Sliema close to Zara.

The entrance to the restaurant, it’s in Sliema close to Zara.

The prices are ok, a little bit expensive at first. We chose the little cheaper options, I had a pasta with basil and tomato and Duilio had a maltese cuisine called ”Dad’s Famous Braggioli”….  and the food….. AMAZING!!! It was sooo goood. Fresh local food, and I don’t know what the heck they had done – but it was the greatest pasta sauce I’ve ever had. We spent about 20€ for two meals with a beer each and it was totally worth it.

Check it out – Ta Kris Restaurant – 80 Fawwara Lane, Sliema, Malta.

Duilio looks forward to eat his plate! Cheers with the local beer Cisk!

Duilio looks forward to eat his plate! Cheers with the local beer Cisk!

The greatest pasta I've ever tasted!!!!!

The greatest pasta I’ve ever tasted!!!!!

Having a Cisk at the balcony!

After dinner we enjoying another Cisk in our balcony! Cozy!

Day 2

Enjoying the breakfast buffet! Haha. We ate all we could!

Enjoying the breakfast buffet! Haha. We ate all we could!

View from the restaurant at our hotel

View from the restaurant at our hotel

We started early by enjoyed the hotels breakfast buffet – yummi yummi. Had everything. Then we went to the Hypogeum which I had booked tickets for long before. You have to be about 2 months ahead to get tickets there, and they cost 30€ each. :/
The Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum is an underground prehistoric burial site. Earliest remains at the site date back to about 4000BC, and the complex was used over a span of many centuries, up to c. 2500 BC. Cool place sure, but you couldn’t take any pictures and only walk around were they had a pavement, and also they only lit up only a few places at a time, if someone was in the way for you to see you missed it. So to me, it wasn’t really worth it.

Picture of the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum from Malta Heritage Site. Didn't look like this while you were there though since only a few parts were lit up at a time.

Picture of the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum from Malta Heritage Site. Didn’t look like this while you were there though since only a few parts were lit up at a time.

Went to the hypogeum. You are not allowed to take any pictures inside. :(

Went to the hypogeum. Just there, in the middle of a neighborhood! Haha

After the visit we went around in the streets in Paola and went to the Tarxien Temples that are quite close, thanks to a map. A funny thing here, nothing is marked out well! We got to the bus station closest to the hypogeum, which is a mayor site of interest, and there are no signs of where it is, you have to ask around how to get there. People here are super friendly, and everyone speaks english! Old ladies, men, teenagers. But there are not really any signs on the street of where the site is until you get to the same road where it is located.

They drive on the wrong side of the road!! Haha. Looks crazy!

They drive on the wrong side of the road!! Haha. Looks crazy!

Walking around on the streets

Walking around on the streets around Paola

We figured we would ”win” on buying a Malta Heritage Multi Ticket for 35€ each with entrances to all the places/museums/temples by Malta Heritage, instead of buying ”loose” entrances to the places we wanted to visit. Very good decision!!! All entrance fees are between 6-10 euros, and I would have gone quite mad at some sites since they didn’t live up to my expectations, but since they entered in the multi ticket (which as a value of 95€ if you visit all the places) – I didn’t mind so much. Hehe.

The Heritage Malta Multi Pass

The Heritage Malta Multisite Pass

The Tarxien Temples was built between 3600 and 2500 BC and re-used between 2400 and 1500 BC. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of six inscribed as ‘The Megalithic Temples of Malta’ in the World Heritage List and one of the largest and most complex of the prehistoric sites on the islands. Home to some of the best examples of prehistoric art which have survived the millennia. Sure a nice place, but much smaller then I thought, took less then 30 minutes to walk through.

The Tarxien temples, a UNESCO world heritage site, dated to approx 3150 BC.

The Tarxien temples, a UNESCO world heritage site, dated to approx 3150 BC.

Old water hole from 3150 BC, nowadays you can throw in a coin and make a wish :)

Old water hole from 3150 BC, nowadays you can throw in a coin and make a wish :)

Some nice engravements

Some of the parts left. Cute little whole there, looks like the big entrances to temples, but a mini version.

This alter is believed to be the place where they sacrified animals, due tu the stone gravings

This alter is believed to be the place where they sacrified animals, due tu the stone gravings

After the Tarxien temples we took the bus to The Three Cities, the harbor in front of Valetta. We visited Vittoriosa, an old fortified city in Malta, very pittoresque and sweet with narrow streets and all limestone buildings here as well as the rest of Malta. We bought some stones there for future jewelry and visited the The Inquisitor’s Palace and the Malta Maritime Museum. The Maritime Museum is nice but nothing I would pay 9€ to see if it wasn’t included in my ticket.

Walking around in Vittoriosa

Walking around in Vittoriosa

The Borgo himself in Vittoriosa!

The Borgo himself in Vittoriosa!

Old diving equipment - omg.. scary!! I'm glad I'm living this decade and using the modern equipment! (At the Malta Maritime museum)

Old diving equipment – omg.. scary!! I’m glad I’m living this decade and using the modern equipment! (At the Malta Maritime museum)

The Inquisitors Palace is the only one open to the public in the world and an architectural gem, representative of the chequered history and European heritage of the Maltese islands. It’s a former centre of power accountable directly to the Pope.  At first a little bit of a deception too, until we got to the prison complex and the torture chamber – where you can see some ”grafitti” from old prisioners – day counting, names and some images carved into the soft limestone. They also have put up som printed stories from the old prisioners that were released. So it was quite cool after all!

Nice place to hang out (The Inquisitor’s Palace).

Nice place to hang out…eh?? (The Inquisitor’s Palace).

A old prisioner was counting the days in the cell in the The Inquisitor’s Palace

A old prisioner was counting the days in the cell in the The Inquisitor’s Palace

Nice bathroom. You can see old rests of excrements along the wall, from the cell window down to the well.

Nice bathroom. You can see old rests of excrements along the wall, from the cell window down to the well.

Duilio trying out the cells bathroom.

Duilio trying out the cells bathroom…

Then we took a boat taxi over to Valetta – the capital city of Malta. It only lives about 7000 people there, and it’s quite small with a couple of main streets.  The city serves as the island’s principal cultural centre and its unique collection of churches and palaces.

Taking a boat taxi with this man over to Valetta!

Taking a boat taxi with this man over to Valetta!

Enjoying our little boat trip in the harbour area for  4€ each!

Enjoying our little boat trip in the harbour area for 4€ each!

We arrived by the water and climbed up for maaaany stairs to get up into the Upper Barraka Gardens. You could also pay 1€ to take the elevator. Funny, a woman came to us and asked for money, we thought it was a beggar at first, but she only wanted to change because the elevator only took 50 cents-coins or 1€ and she had everything in 10 and 20 cents haha. Then I realized – there are no beggars here and you don’t see homeless people either. Weird!

View from the Upper Barrakka gardens

View from the Upper Barrakka gardens

<3

<3

At the upper Barakka Gardens we had a couple of Maltesean pastizzes and pies, filled with chick peas and Ricotta-cheese. Delicious, and the pastizzes only cost 70cents and the pies 1,5€. We sat there for a while and then started to walk around Valetta.

In the upper barakka gardens where we had some snacks and beer

In the upper barakka gardens where we had some snacks and beer

Enjoying some pastizzes and lokal beer with a nice view over the city!

Enjoying some pastizzes and lokal beer with a nice view over the city!

We visited the The National Museum of Archaeology. It serves as a good introduction to prehistory and early history in Malta and puts Malta’s archaeological sites in context, but we were a little bit tired of seeing artifacts and tools.

Very cool timeline at the National Museum of Archaeology, showing about 2000 years of Malta

Very cool timeline at the National Museum of Archaeology, showing about 2000 years of Malta

Old tumb at the National Museum of Archaeology

Old tumb at the National Museum of Archaeology

Instead we walked around Valetta, which is also a UNESCO world heritage site and plenty of films like Troy, Gladiator, World War Z have been filmed here. We even found a leather craftsmen who made the costume to all those movies! Hehe. This city is quite weird, there are totally abandoned buildings with a super nice sea view, just next to some church.

For a second Duilio thought someone had stolen his sunglasses, but then we walked back a block and they were lying there on the ground. Malta is actually super safe, you can easily walk around with money and phones and camaras, you don’t feel like a target for robbery. It’s one of the safest countries in Europe. 

We bought some local sweets (honey rings) and went down to the wall that surrounds Valetta and enjoying the last sun of the day.

Tourists...... hahah

Tourists…… hahaha. (how many people can fit in a phone cabin?)

Sitting on the wall in Valetta with a view over to Sliema.

Sitting on the wall in Valetta with a view over to Sliema.

Traditional honey rings! Yummi.

Traditional honey rings! Yummi.

Reminds me of Roma :)

Reminds me of Roma :)

Churches and saints in every corner!

Churches and saints in every corner!

Cats are everywhere in Malta! The locals give them food so they seem well, even though they are everywhere.

Cats are everywhere in Malta! The locals give them food so they seem well, even though they are everywhere.

View over a roof, the dog and the cats starring at us. hehe.

View over a roof, the dog and the cats starring at us. hehe.

View over the ferry terminal in Valetta, and the wall were we were sitting before

View over the ferry terminal in Valetta, and the wall were we were sitting before

We thought we were lost until we saw this sign to the ferry haha. Generally things are not marked out so well here! Very important museums and archeological sites are just next to total regular neighbourhood, without any signs pointing them out until you reach the same street the site is at. Haha.

We thought we were lost until we saw this sign to the ferry haha.

So, this was the first days in Malta….. More to come!!